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Longitudinal Section of Smooth Muscle in Rat (20x)

Image 5 of 9 in Series "Connective Tissue and Muscle Types"

Description

There are no striations compared to those seen in skeletal muscle. The nuclei (one shown by the red arrow) depicted in the image are centrally located in each muscle fiber.

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This image is part of the series "Connective Tissue and Muscle Types"

Other images in this series

Dense Irregular Connective Tissue in Dog Skin (10x)

by: Caleb Bacak, BS, BA; Sheba MohanKumar, BVSc, MS, PhD

Nuclei (stained dark blue) belong to fibroblasts that secrete collagen. The fibers surrounding the fibroblasts are type 1 collagen. These fibers run in all different directions with no visible nuclei (red arrow).

Loose Irregular Connective Tissue in Dog Larynx (10x)

by: Caleb Bacak, BS, BA; Sheba MohanKumar, BVSc, MS, PhD

The red arrow indicates a fibroblast with a hyperchromatic nucleus. The collagen fibers run in different directions and are loosely arranged. They are separated by extracellular matrix. The yellow arrow indicates a space between fibers that once contained the extracellular matrix, which was washed out during slide preparation.

Longitudinal Section of a Rat Tendon (10x)

by: Caleb Bacak, BS, BA; Sheba MohanKumar, BVSc, MS, PhD

The red arrow shows a group of fibroblasts. The green arrow points to a collagen (type 1) fiber. The fibers run in the same direction giving a more regular appearance - hence the name dense, regular collagenous connective tissue. This tissue is present in tendons and ligaments.

Cross Section of a Skeletal Muscle in Dog Larynx (10x)

by: Caleb Bacak, BS, BA; Sheba MohanKumar, BVSc, MS, PhD

The red arrow indicates a muscle fiber or muscle cell. The green arrow points to the cell’s nucleus, which is located on the periphery. Muscle fibers are organized as bundles or fascicles. Each fascicle is surrounded by a thin layer of connective tissue called the perimysium (blue arrow).

Cardiac Muscle in Rat (20x)

by: Caleb Bacak, BS, BA; Sheba MohanKumar, BVSc, MS, PhD

The red arrow points to a centrally placed nucleus. There are striations in cardiac muscle, but the muscle fibers of the heart are smaller than those in skeletal muscle. Intercalated discs between myocardial cells (one shown by the yellow arrow) are only found in cardiac muscle.

White Adipose Tissue in Rat Pericardium (20x)

by: Caleb Bacak, BS, BA; Sheba MohanKumar, BVSc, MS, PhD

The blue arrow shows a unilocular adipocyte, while the red arrow points to the cell nucleus. The interior of the adipocyte is filled with lipids, and the cytoplasm is pushed to the periphery (black arrow). The lipids are washed out during slide preparation.

Beige Adipose Tissue in Rat Thoracic Cavity (20x)

by: Caleb Bacak, BS, BA; Sheba MohanKumar, BVSc, MS, PhD

There is a mixture of unilocular and multilocular adipocytes. The lipid vacuoles in the adipocytes vary greatly in size. The red arrow points to a single adipocyte with large vacuoles. The blue arrow points to the nucleus of an adipocyte with smaller vacuoles. The cytoplasm of the adipocytes (staining pink) is more clearly visible (green arrow) in this tissue. Beige adipose tissue is seen when white adipose tissue undergoes browning as a physiological adaptation to cold stress or chronic beta-adrenergic stimulation.

Brown Adipose Tissue around Rat Adrenal (20x)

by: Caleb Bacak, BS, BA; Sheba MohanKumar, BVSc, MS, PhD

The blue arrow points to a brown adipocyte, which is filled with many small lipid vacuoles. These adipocytes are said to be multilocular and contain a higher concentration of mitochondria. The inner mitochondrial membrane contains uncoupling protein 1 which is essential for heat generation. Brown adipose tissue therefore plays an important role in thermoregulation.