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Pulsed-wave Doppler of the Aortic Valve

Image 4 of 4 in Series "Echocardiographic Doppler Evaluation for Tamponade Physiology"

Description

In order to assess for aortic inflow variation, a pulsed-wave Doppler is placed across the aortic valve in the apical 5 chamber window, the sweep speed is turned down to 25mm/s and with respirometer tracing on. Two measurements are made, one at the peak E-wave during normal inspiration and one at the peak E-wave during expiration. A difference of at least 10% is considered significant for tamponade physiology. In this example, the patient had an inspiratory reduction in peak E-wave velocity of 11%.

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This image is part of the series "Echocardiographic Doppler Evaluation for Tamponade Physiology"

Other images in this series

Subcostal window

by: Raymond Mai, DO

The subcostal window is important for the evaluation of a pericardial effusion because it is also the same imaging window used during a pericardiocentesis.

Pulsed-wave Doppler of the Mitral Valve

by: Raymond Mai, DO

In order to assess for mitral inflow variation, a pulsed-wave Doppler is placed across the mitral valve in the apical 4 chamber window, the sweep speed is turned down to 25mm/s and with respirometer tracing on. Two measurements are made, one at the peak E-wave during normal inspiration and one at the peak E-wave during expiration. A difference of at least 25% is considered significant for tamponade physiology. In this example, the patient had an inspiratory reduction in peak E-wave velocity of 26%.

Pulsed-wave Doppler of the Tricuspid Valve

by: Raymond Mai, DO

In order to assess for tricuspid inflow variation, a pulsed-wave Doppler is placed across the tricuspid valve in the apical 4 chamber window, the sweep speed is turned down to 25mm/s and with respirometer tracing on. Two measurements are made, one at the peak E-wave during normal inspiration and one at the peak E-wave during expiration. A difference of at least 40% is considered significant for tamponade physiology. In this example, the patient had an inspiratory reduction in peak E-wave velocity of 53%.